Peter RagnerPeter wrote the Foreword to my book, Achieving Great Health. Dr. Gabriel Cousens wrote the Introduction. I was as proud as you can imagine that he did so. Peter also went over the entire book with me, page by page, helping me to correct it. It was an incredibly nice thing for Peter to do. Anne also enjoyed the book and told me so. I interviewed Peter 20 times on my radio show, Achieving Great Health Radio Show. Peter has only been interviewed a few times and I was honored to have him on Achieving Great Health, The Radio Show each Friday for 20 weeks. It was amazing and as a result of the interviews we produced a 16 CD set together. I am also honored to call Peter a friend. We spent many hours together off-air discussing many various topics that ranged from health to philosophy to spirituality and martial arts. Peter taught me many things about chi gong and he expanded my understanding of how to use powerful magnets. Peter is an incredibly health, strong person and I admire his intellect and perseverance. He and Tony, his partner, are great people who truly understand health.

Peter is Author of seventeen books, including the Best Seller How Long Do You Chose to Live? He can be found at: www.roaringlionpublishing.com He is Inventor of Magnetic Chi Gong and a 100% Raw Foodist. I consider Peter a Sage.

Many people have asked me How Old Is Peter?

"Writing an introduction to explain Peter is something I would have liked to avoid. Peter defies description. It is analogous to telling someone a funny story only to have them stare at you with blank incomprehension. You wind up saying Simply, "You had to be there."

Peter lives on a 12-acre parcel of land adjoining the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. A parcel of land that had somehow been "overlooked" by realtors and city officials until he showed up 20 years ago to buy it. He built a spacious three-story, 24-room house on his mountaintop with his own hands, often taking a piece of wood and cutting it to the exact length without ever measuring it (much to the discomfiture of those friends who accompanied and assisted him).

It is his friends, many of whom have moved to Tennessee to be near him, who will tell you why he is called "The Magic Man." Miracles and psychokinetic effects seem to trail him like an invisible circus. His friends tell of countless healing, candles that puff out and re-light themselves, a violin that plucks its own strings, and of wine that pours from his hand. I myself observed half-full wine glasses tipping over by themselves at dinner to punctuate our conversation. We laughed as though it was the funniest thing in the world while Ann, his companion , gave him a mock scolding for staining the tablecloth. These could be dismissed as musician's tricks, perhaps, but there are myriad "coincidences" as well, like the "overlooked" parcel of land, or the swarm of honeybees he wanted that arrived the day after he said he would be getting some bees as a "present from spirit" for the help he had given to someone who had been sick. His friends have gathered these stories together in a book entitled "The Magic Man."

I found that the gentler miracles lingered the longest after my visit: the light and love I was showered with, the curious deer, the ever-present bears that ambled out of the forest for a peanut snack on the deck, and the sight of a tiny bear cub climbing the tree nearest to Peter's bedroom - the tree his protective mother decided offered the greatest safety in a forest known for poachers.

Then there was Peter himself. He seems to embody all the heroes of myth and legend. He will remind one person of Buddha, another of Christ, and others of Krishna, Lao-Tzu, or the biblical Simon Peter. To me he was a combination of Castaneda's Don Juan and one of Tolkien's High Elves - alternately poking my self-importance and then entertaining me in the fire-lit hall of the mountain king. I despaired of getting any straight answers from him about himself. He would rather teach me about myself. One time I had to tell him to stop or "I'd explode." He laughed and said, "That's the idea!"

As I questioned him about his past, it seemed as thought he had to strain to remember, as though forcing his mind to step out of the present moment was a forgotten habit, a way of being that had been attached to an ego he had long ago discarded."
Taken from Peter's Website